A Soldier’s Sacrifice

Little me in Germany, wearing the hat to my dad's uniform

Little me in Germany, wearing the hat to my dad’s uniform

“Why do you have to go?” she asked
as tears rolled down her cheeks.
It didn’t matter if he left
for years or months or weeks.
The question asked was innocent,
a plea to comprehend
why daddy wasn’t always home
to hold his daughter’s hand.

He wondered how he could explain
as he answered her demand;
he stumbled over every word
and prayed she’d understand.

“Daddy’s got a job to do
that takes him far away,
protecting weak and innocent
even though he’d rather stay.
He made a solemn promise
to answer freedom’s call
and defend our rights with honor
when our back’s against the wall.”

He wrapped an arm around his wife,
his child tucked to his heart,
his bags lay waiting by the door,
he hated to depart.

“Babe, you know I love you both,”
he squeezed both angels tight.
“God keep you safe while I’m away.
Pray for me every night.
Your sacrifice, as great as mine,
is rarely seen or heard;
head held high with dignity,
you never say a word.”

With one last kiss he turned away
and headed out the door,
just another soldier,
Headed off to war.

This is probably not my best piece or poetry, but it’s how my appreciation for those who’ve served (along with their families) manifested itself today. As some of you have probably deduced from my post from last Veteran’s Day entitled I Bled For You I have a strong affinity to those who’ve served or are serving in the armed forces. I have so much respect for those who decide day in and day out to lay their lives on the line to serve and protect so that their fellow countrymen don’t have to. It’s not an easy cross to bear by any stretch of the imagination.

The above pic was taken of me as a girl when my family was stationed in Germany. It was the dead of winter and I felt so cool being allowed to wear my father’s winter hat, especially since it was part of his uniform. As a child of the military, we were afforded the opportunity to travel with my dad. Germany was one of a few countries we had the chance to see thanks to his career.

One of the other places I hold near and dear to my heart is the Philippines. It’s made more special by the fact that my mother is Filipina, so I’m sure you can imagine how much it breaks my heart to read or see all the damage done to a place I once called home. If you haven’t heard about the devastation that hit my former birthplace, check this out. Death toll is in the 10,000’s. By the way, the island of Leyte, where the worst of the damage seems to be? That’s my mom’s birthplace. If you’d like to find a way to help, here are some great links. This is a third world country and the devastation is unreal. I know the indomitable spirit of my fellow Filipinos, but they could use all the prayers, good vibes, great thoughts…and yes, monetary support if you can.

For my kababayan friends- Ikaw ay nasa aking mga saloobin at panalangin. Aking puso pinaghihiwa para sa mga ganap na pagkasira na dulot ng Haiyan.

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26 thoughts on “A Soldier’s Sacrifice

  1. ramblingsfromamum says:

    Your poem was beautifully penned Kitt – the feelings have come through and you have written a heartfelt post. My thoughts are with your friends and family in the Philippines – such a horrific and monumental tragedy. (hugss)
    I have written 2 in a Series of 3 about my Pop – if I may share the 2nd with you?http://ramblingsfromamum.wordpress.com/2013/11/11/the-young-man-series-part-2/ (feel free to delete if you wish- I won’t be offended) xx

        • Kitt Crescendo says:

          Always. If you read the link I shared from my last year’s post, “I Bled For You”, you know just how highly I feel about their selfless sacrifices. I have yet to tackle a soldier’s life from a POW’s point of view, though.

          Your dad & some of my other friends who survived being prisoners of war are so courageous that the mere thought of what they’ve experienced brings me to tears.

          • ramblingsfromamum says:

            It is late now – but I shall read it tomorrow. It is sad that their sacrifices go unnoticed by the young – not knowing the hardships, the starvation, the cruelty that existed. As long as there are Wars we will have this ~ just in a different way 😦 xxx

  2. susielindau says:

    Fantastic tribute and poem. What has happened in the Philippines is hard to comprehend. I heard a college student from CU say that bodies were everywhere. I think these intense storms are going to get more frequent. So very sad.

    • Kitt Crescendo says:

      Thanks, Susie. I’m afraid you’re right about both the devastation & frequency of the storms. I find myself praying constantly for hope for the people going through it and for the safety of everyone there I hold dear.

  3. Don't Quote Lily says:

    I heard about the devastation…I truly hope they get the help they need, and that no one you know was affected. It’s so terrible. My heart breaks every time I hear of these storms just shattering through these areas. My heart goes out to all those people. 😦 There have been way too many storms in these last few years. 😦

    Also, the poem was beautiful. I love the way you write about this subject, you can just TELL how near and dear to your heart it is.

    • Kitt Crescendo says:

      The devastation is awful. I’m drawn to watching the news to get updates, but can only take it in small doses at a time as it makes me want to bawl my heart out. Filipinos are such gentle, loving people and it tears me up to see all the devastation in a country I love.

      As for the comments. Thanks. Love and patriotism are things I was raised experiencing. I can’t help but try to share my admiration and respect for those who’ve served.

  4. filbio says:

    Beautifully written and poignant poem.My fiancee’s brother is over in Afganistan and his wife is home alone in Texas. We all hope for his safe return home.

    What has happened in the Philippines is total tragedy. The scenes of devastation is unreal. I pray for those poor people suffering over there. It was good to see the Marines over there helping with the efforts already.

    • Kitt Crescendo says:

      The hardest parts on a family are the deployments that require the soldier to be away. I’ll add his family to my prayers. Being the one left behind, waiting for news is pretty tough, too.

      It does help to see our guys over there, giving aid, helping to rebuild. Somehow it seems only right, since we were there on our bases for so many years. GIs used to love hearing they were going to be sent there because it was both beautiful and welcoming.

  5. amadiex says:

    That poem made me misty eyed. I thought you did a wonderful job there. I know the devastation in the Philippines is hard to watch and I offer my sincerest hope and prayer for loved ones and family. I think it was a good idea to include links to offer possibilities to help. Thanks for sharing.

  6. Tana Bevan says:

    It has been said when you “sing from the heart” it is among the most beautiful sounds g-d hears (even if others ask you to shut up). Poetry from the heart is among the most beautiful sounds to the soul, regardless of what the critics (self or others) have to say. Thank you for reverence you brought my soul.

  7. Charron's Chatter says:

    you are so koot!!! I lived in Switz for 2 years as a teenager…we have a lot in common, Kitt, I think…

    spricht du deutsch?…maybe not–you look a tot, and now we are back to the koot again. 🙂

    • Kitt Crescendo says:

      Believe it or not, I still remember a couple things from my time in Germany (mostly 1-10 and Good morning, afternoon, and night).

      It does seem like we share several things in common! 🙂

    • Kitt Crescendo says:

      Actually, all my military stories have been like that. See what I mean about tangible connection? It’s just there. Maybe part of it is having lived that life as a child, but I think a big part is somehow God is preparing me to write something bigger…celebrating these folks and the sacrifices they make.

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